Private Tour of Aubrey Beardsley Exhibition at Tate Britain

Thu 23 April 2020 : 9:00am – 10:00am

Drawing Room is pleased to offer Drawing Circle members, and a limited number of Network members, the opportunity to attend a private tour of the Aubrey Beardsley exhibition at Tate Britain.

Aubrey Beardsley shocked and delighted late-Victorian London with his sinuous black and white drawings. He explored the erotic and the elegant, the humorous and grotesque, winning admirers around the world with his distinctive style. Spanning seven years, this exhibition will cover Beardsley’s intense and prolific career as a draughtsman and illustrator, cut short by his untimely death from tuberculosis, aged 25. 

This will be the first exhibition dedicated to Beardsley at Tate since 1923, and the largest display of his original drawings in Europe since the seminal 1966 exhibition at the V&A, which triggered a Beardsley revival. The over 200 works include his celebrated illustrations for Le Morte d’Arthur, Lysistrata and Oscar Wilde’s Salomé. It will also show artworks that were key inspirations for Beardsley, including Japanese scrolls and watercolours by Edward Burne-Jones and Gustave Moreau.

Please email [email protected] to book a place on the tour.

The event is part of Drawing Room's exclusive events programme for Drawing Circle members. Drawing Network members are welcome to join for a £30 donation. If you wish to become a member and access our private events please contact Silvia Denaro or visit our Join page.

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Aubrey Beardsley, Cover Design for the ‘Yellow Book’ (detail), 1894, Ink on paper, 260 x 216mm. Image courtesy of Tate. Bequeathed by John Lane 1926.

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Aubrey Beardsley, La Dame aux Camelias, 1894, Ink and watercolour on paper, 279 x 181mm. Image courtesy of Tate. Presented by Colonel James Lister Melvill at the request of his brother, Harry Edward Melvill 1931.

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Aubrey Beardsley, Design for the Frontispiece to John Davidson’s Plays, 1894, Ink and graphite on paper, 286 x 187mm. Image courtesy of Tate. Bequeathed by John Lane 1926.