Brian O’€™Doherty

Brian O’Doherty  (b. 1928,  Ballaghaderreen, Ireland) lives and works in the United States. He studied medicine at University College Dublin, and did post-graduate work at Cambridge University and at the Harvard School of Public Health. He left Ireland for New York in 1957 and emerged as one of the most influential artists in the American art scene of the 1960s. O'Doherty began using the pseudonym 'Patrick Ireland' in reaction to the Bloody Sunday killings in Derry in 1972. He was an art critic for the New York Times, an editor of Art in America, and an on-air art critic for NBC. He was director of the Visual Arts Program and, subsequently, Director of the Media Arts Program, National Endowment for the Arts, where he was responsible for the creation of such major public television series as American Masters and Great Performances. He is the author of numerous works of art criticism, including American Masters and the profoundly influential book Inside the White Cube: Ideologies of the Gallery Space. He has also written novels The Strange Case of Mademoiselle P. (1992) and the 2000 Booker Prize-nominated The Deposition of Father McGreevey (1999). He had a retrospective at Dublin's Hugh Lane Municipal Gallery of Modern Art in 2005.

In 2008, in recognition of the progress for peace in Ireland, O'Doherty ceremoniously buried his alter ego at the Irish Museum of Modern Art in Dublin and resumed use of his birth name.

Last updated: 08.10.2014

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